9/1/2009

Most African Americans responded pretty calmly. They were all mad, but Martin Luther King Jr. told them all to act calm and let the whites get they're anger out but not to fight back. Like during all the protests the African Americans never fought back, they were all very calm with tho whole thing. However they participated in many boycotts, protests, and other things, such as the bus boycott, the sit-in in North Carolina and many more.

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Jessica Reed
9/1/2009

Other than African Americans, Mexican Americans fought for equality also. They were concerned about immigration and citizenship. One key Mexican American was Cesar Chavez. He worked with Dolores Huerta to create a labor union for farmers. Chavez, like Martin Luther King, Jr., protested nonviolently. For example, in 1965 Cesar Chavez led a grape boycott. Furthermore, in 1968, Mexican American students protested the poor education they had. By 1970, they formed La Raza Unida to elect Mexican Americans to positions to get better jobs and education.

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Arjun Rajesh
9/1/2009

None of the african americans were happy. Leaders such as Ceser Chavez and Martin Luther King helped them fight back in a nonviolent way. They led boycotts. A very efficient boycott was the bus boycott because the vast majority of bus riders were african americans. There were also sit-in's such as the Greensbro sit-in. There were marches like the Selma to Montgomery march.

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Arjun Rajesh
9/14/2009

Most of the white americans liked discrimination. They found some nasty pleasure in treating the african americans badly. However not all white americans felt like this. A lot of them disapproved of segregation. For example, in the march on washington a lot of white people participated. Of course none of the minorities were happy. They wanted to be treated like human beings. They wanted goood schooling and good jobs. They probably felt like fighting back against the white americans. However they responded in non-violent ways (sit-ins and boycotts).

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Jessica Reed
9/15/2009

African Americans responded to discrimination by protesting. One example of African Americans doing this is the Little Rock Nine. They protested againist segregation by integrating into Central Highschool in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Jessica Reed
10/2/2009

When thinking about discrimination during the civil rights movement, most people don't think about African Americans who played sports. Blacks couldn't play at the professional level all the time, and if they did it was a struggle. Imagine playing in a game, and people start yelling at you and throwing cans and popcorn. However, it's not because you are playing bad, but that you are an African American. This was very hard on blacks. Some African Americans succumbed to the whites. However, one special African American didn't, and his name is Jackie Robinson. In 1947, Jackie Robinson became the 1st African American to play Major League Baseball. His determination inspired other blacks to continue to fight for what they wanted.

Sources:
http://www.voicesofcivilrights.org/robinson/robinson.html

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Arjun Rajesh
10/3/2009

They didn't respond well. Any of us would hate it if some other race told us we weren't fit to walk this Earth. I don't think that we can ever understand what these African Americans went through. There were some amazing musicians and atheletes. They were all denied because of their race. Of course nobody would stand for it. There were many forms of protest. Something that promoted discrimination was the great depression. People would just stop hiring blacks. Some thing that also made them mad was that even after all they did in WWII they got poor treatment. It is like we have the rights to serve the country but not to get civil rights. The worst part was that not only did blacks react but whites too. They formed a gang called Klu Klux Klan who murdered blacks.

http://www.worldbook.com/wb/Students?content_spotlight/aajourney/civilrights http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761580647_2/civil_rights_movement_in_the_united_states.html

http://sun.menloschool.org/~sportman/ethnic/individual/kkk/

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